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Osun House of Assembly holds public hearing on Amotekun, harps on synergy

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The Osun State House of Assembly on Monday held a public hearing on the draft bill to establish the proposed Western Nigeria Security Network codenamed Operation Amotekun.

The hearing, which was convened after the bill passed second reading on the floor of the house comprised all critical stakeholders in the security architecture of the state.

The Speaker of the House, Rt. Hon. Timothy Owoeye, in his remarks, said the concept of Amotekun was conceived to complement efforts of conventional security agencies for the purpose of maintaining law and order in the state.

He added that when the bill is passed, it would ensure safe highways, remote areas, waterways, hinterlands among others.

According to him, the floated security outfit would also provide job opportunities for teeming youths in the state and the region in general, asides it’s focus towards addressing internal security challenges.

He stressed that for Amotekun to be successful, it requires concerted efforts of every individual in the zone, saying section 24 of the constitution provides that “it shall be the duty of every citizen to make positive and useful contribution to the advancement, progress and well-being of the community where he resides.”

Meanwhile, the representative of National Council of Muslim Youth Organisation (NACOMYO) at the public hearing, Jamiu Adeyemi stressed the need to consider the security of worship centres in the draft bill, noting that such places are soft target for criminals.

Also speaking, Prof Aliyu Alao of African Security Forum, urged the parliament to create room for active involvement of Nigerians living in the diaspora for the smooth implementation and sustainability of the security arrangement.

He, therefore, pledged supports of his group and many other Nigerians abroad for the new security outfit in the zone.

The Aragbiji of Iragbiji, Oba Abdrasheed Olabomi, in his short speech, faulted the exclusion of traditional rulers in the implementation of the security outfit as contained in the draft bill.

He argued that traditional rulers understand the security architecture of their domains better than public office holders, hence the need to get palaces fully involved for better performance.



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